How to Throw An Eco-Chic Party

By Elizabeth Stilwell

In my last post, I pointed out the incredible waste of the traditional party industry. Plastic decorations, one-off themes, and balloons are nothing to celebrate. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Even if you are a serial party thrower, investment in basic dishware and linens in neutral colors will provide the appropriate backdrop for any celebration. Rather than a predetermined set of themed plasticware, natural and compostable decorations can change the atmosphere of each gathering. This way of thinking will bring simplicity to the process and give you room to shine as the creative host I know you are. You just need three little tweaks.

Use Natural, Reusable, or Compostable Decorations

Decorate with produce, flowers, plants, branches, paper, or textiles. It will be lovely, promise. Eschew disposable for reusable (aka “real”) dishes, flatware, and glasses — think of the sophistication of it! Get what you need over time (and on the cheap) at thrift stores which are always flush with glasses and dishware. For kids’ parties or when reusable just isn’t reasonable, choose compostable paper or plant-based products (and compost them, obvs). If you’re attending a party or picnic, consider bringing this nifty travel cutlery set

Check out these sites for eco-friendly decorations:

Avoid Packaged Food

Packaged food is devastatingly convenient, but creates a lot of waste. Instead of cooking everything yourself, make things easy — have a potluck and encourage homemade fare. Avoid packaging by making party mixes from bulk bought items like nuts, beans, seeds, or dried fruit (this kind of food makes for great party favors as well). Try these sweet and salty chickpeas from Cupcake Project or mixed nuts from Baker by Nature

Keep things healthy and zero waste by cutting up fresh fruits and veggies to serve with dips. Check out this roasted red pepper hummus from Deliciously Ella for veggies. For fruit, make this raw salted caramel dip by Detoxinista

 

A baker I am not, but damn, homemade desserts are good. I make simple ones like this banana split crumble by immaEATthat (sub vegan whipped cream) or these raw caramel apples by This Rawsome Vegan Life

Whatever you make, partygoers will appreciate it. Everyone loves free food. 

Have Useful or Natural Activities & Favors (or none at all)

Whether it’s a birthday party or a professional conference, swag is often useless plastic junk. It’s played with for about half a second and then it’s probably added to the tsunami of plastic overtaking the ocean. I’ll first say that you don’t even need favors because spending time together is the point of a party. But if you must have them, win all the parties by having cool or useful favors like mushroom farms, seed bombs, or DIY wooden (or cardboard) ukuleles. Also look for recyclable or compostable packaging. Don’t want to spend that much on favors? Send home the flowers you decorated with, or baked goodies, or email photographs out later, or maybe you really don’t need them. Have fun, be together, and take home memories instead of tchotchkes. 

Activities at the party fall under the same guidelines. Think about what could be useful or zero waste. Maybe it’s making part of the food for the party. Maybe it’s terrariums or planting a garden. Throw a clothing, jewelry, or book swap (a kids’ book swap would be swell). Play board games. Gather for community service or a drive for some needed good. Just don’t box yourself in with traditional party games.

With a little bit of thought and a few tweaks, your celebrations can be low to zero waste. Once you’ve got the hang of it, the simplicity will make throwing a party together as easy as vegan peanut butter pie

One caveat: if this thing with climate change does go really poorly, you might consider some of these survival-themed favors. That last one’s just for making gin. 😉

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means I get a small commission if you buy anything through the link (it doesn’t change the amount you pay). I only include brands that I believe in, that I would use myself, or think might be of interest to you. 

 

Elizabeth StilwellABOUT THE AUTHOR

With a background in education, Elizabeth Stilwell produces engaging, actionable content as editor-in-chief of The Note Passer . A proud sustainability nerd, her aim is to be a resource for ethical alternatives that benefit both people and the environment. The Note Passer is inspiration for better, sustainable future; one that’s full of more meaning and less waste. Elizabeth’s graphics, photography, and words have have appeared on EF Magazine, Moral Fibres, BF+DA, EcoGreenLove, and others. She is also a co-founder of the Ethical Writers Coalition, a group of writers who are furthering ethical and sustainable living online and in print.

 

 

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